Saturday, February 9, 2008

(FL)Gov. believes lock-them-up mentality for juveniles often makes them worse

Quote:
"As Gov. Crist always says, we can never give up on our young people," said Lt. Gov. Jeff Kottkamp of Southwest Florida. "The governor believes that a 'lock-them-up' mentality for juveniles often makes them worse. That approach throws away the keys to rehabilitation."

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What about the many children who are abandoned to life and life with no chance of parole, how about abolishing THAT??? Does the gov actually KNOW first hand, the abuse these children suffer on a daily basis, so many left to be forgotten, doomed to die in prison. What about them???

Advocates are highly encouraged to write the gov and Lt gov of Florida, speaking up for these children. Email and postal addresses at the link below
http://www.flgov.com/contact_form ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080208/OPINION/802080330/1015
Editorial Report
right on juveniles
Originally posted on February 08, 2008

Finally, we have something like an official position by the State of Florida that the get-tough approach to juvenile crime has failed miserably. For the vast majority of juveniles in trouble, early intervention and rehabilitation work much better in preventing the kid from turning into an adult criminal. "As Gov. Crist always says, we can never give up on our young people," said Lt. Gov. Jeff Kottkamp of Southwest Florida. "The governor believes that a 'lock-them-up' mentality for juveniles often makes them worse. That approach throws away the keys to rehabilitation." Kottkamp spoke this week as he took delivery of a report from the Blueprint Commission charged with finding ways to reform juvenile justice in Florida. It made 52 recommendations aimed largely at diverting juveniles away from incarceration toward programs aimed at making them productive citizens. Included are community-based programs to keep kids out of the system, small residential facilities that better nurture offenders, and more attention to mental and physical health needs. Special concerns include the large numbers of minority youngsters locked up by the system, the lack of programs for girls and the "zero tolerance" programs in schools that have made criminal offenses out of many minor transgressions. This approach will cost lots of money, but it's cheaper than letting kids become criminals - and it better protects the public.

Newsday.com(c)

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